If you follow me at all on Twitter, or happen to navigate around this web site a bit, instead of doing an organic search jump-and-dive, you know that I've been working with video a little bit, and I've been stepping up the tutorial videos.

A while back, when I started doing this, I was doing it under my personal profile, so I just continued. I wanted it to be a Codepunk YouTube channel, but needed to wait until 100 subscribers to change my URL. Instead of waiting, I decided to create a brand account for Codepunk, so we could upload the podcast episodes. This brand account didn't get much traffic, but my personal YouTube was because of the Bot Framework tutorials. There was no way to transfer videos, and I didn't want to re-upload them, or switch channel locations mid-tutorial, so I just continued with mine.

Over last weekend, I found a feature on YouTube that allowed you to convert your personal channel to a brand channel. I selected the currently created Codepunk one, and I crossed my fingers. I ended up losing the podcast episodes when it merged the two accounts together, but it successfully transferred the videos and subscribers, while latching onto the Codepunk name. I was then able to grab a channel URL for Codepunk.

It was an... almost smooth transition. Some of the URLs and cached components made it look weird for a while, and I've been bleeding subscribers for what I can only guess is YouTube algorithm confusion, but things have stabilized. I've update the channel description to include Codepunk and information on Bill as well.

There were some videos that didn't make sense to be on Codepunk, so I deleted them, and then had to recreate a personal channel to find some place to put them. I have no clue what to do with this personal channel, but might do some vlogging. I've currently be broadcasting Defiance 2050 gameplay, and posting the recordings on YouTube.

Where will we take Codepunk? Right now, I have several different video tutorial series' lined up, and this is a great way for us to pump out content, and increase subscribers. It's content that provides value. I'm not sitting there telling you about how great I am, and trying to get you to buy a book so you can be like me. There's too much of that on YouTube already. I want Codepunk to provide consistent, quality content. The consistency is there, and the quality is getting there.

In a few months--when I have a semi-studio set up--we'll be creating other forms of content that I hope give the channel a unique feel.

In the meantime, feel free to subscribe.

(Photo by Jaro Larnos)